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Archive for the ‘Plants’ Category

Snake plant2

Snake Plant (Sansevieria trifasciata), July

A strange and wonderful thing happened this past July: our Snake Plant bloomed! Almost hidden behind a couch in the living room, it’s usually “out of sight, out of mind”. When I finally discovered where the mysterious and beautiful fragrance was coming from, I was delighted to find that it was this rare bloom sending forth its perfume. It lasted for many days, with a fragrance lovelier than the lily’s, and quite intoxicating. Apparently they bloom more readily if neglected, which this long-suffering houseplant definitely is! Here’s more information:

Snake Plant Info – How To Grow A Snake Plant And Snake Plant Care

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERARhododendron (a small, unknown variety), Spring

I’m including this unusual-looking Rhodo because I’ve never seen one bloom in this manner before. It seemed to go rather wild this year. Maybe it’s suffering from a bit of neglect just like the Snake Plant is, and is valiantly trying to reproduce itself…who knows? Can anyone name this Rhodo?

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Bugleweed (Ajuga reptans), Spring

It may be considered a weed by some, but I love it anyway! Here’s the Ajuga, bravely flowering in amongst the Sedums, Valerian and bamboo shoots. Such a gorgeous shade of purplish blue.

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Japonica (Chaenomeles), sometimes known as “Ornamental Quince”, Spring

Possibly my favourite flowering shrub in our garden, this particular beauty has survived two changes of address in the past 25 years. It produces plum-sized fruits every year, which the squirrels cart off with some difficulty.

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Camellia japonica, Spring

Another hardy survivor, this healthy shrub was given to me by a good friend, many years ago. It, too, has lived through two garden moves…maybe three. Such resilience!

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Lewisia, Spring

While it bloomed brilliantly on the deck, this Lewisia’s container remained upright when the raccoon scaled the railing behind it! You can see the raccoon’s paw prints on the white boards in the background. City raccoons are resilient, too…they have to be, to survive the traffic in Vancouver!

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Sage (Salvia officinalis), Summer

And over in our daughter’s garden, here’s the ever-hardy Sage plant. I only wish that I used it in my cooking! However, the bees do love it, and its strong fragrance is quite refreshing.

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Seaside Plantain (Plantago maritima), Summer

Yes, this is usually classified as a weed among the gardening aficionados! But the lowly Seaside Plantain leaves are actually edible, and this native plant could be classified as a (an) herb. Besides, I like the look of it!

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Basil (Ocimum basilicum), Summer

Who can resist Pasta with Pesto, made with fresh basil leaves? Delicious!

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Sun Rose or Moss Rose (Portulaca grandiflora), Summer

This reliable, colourful little plant is actually a tender annual, and is not hardy. I used to plant it in a boulevard bed, but have resorted to potting it in a container, because the dogs and squirrels tended to interfere with it every summer. Portulaca flowers make me smile!

I’ll end this post with a couple of thought-provoking quotations:

***Garden as though you will live forever.

                                   —William Kent (1685-1748) British architect & Landscape architect

***You cannot get through a single day without having an impact on the world around you. What you do makes a difference, and you have to decide what kind of difference you want to make.

                                     —Jane Goodall (b. 1934) English Primatologist

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Kabocha Squash on the front boulevard… August, 2019.

Instead of growing troublesome and thirsty grass on the boulevards and in the front and back gardens, our family is growing FOOD!! I don’t want to sound egotistical here, but we are pleased and surprised at just how much food can be grown on a city lot. It’s quite amazing, and gratifying, to head out to the garden and pick a bowlful of vegetables for dinner. Anyone can do it! Thanks to my husband and son-in-law, we’ve had a steady supply of veggies, and even raspberries, all summer long.

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All sorts of lettuce in a pot.

Every few weeks throughout the spring and summer, more lettuce seeds were planted, resulting in an ongoing supply of fresh salad greens. Some seeds were planted in the raised beds, some in pots, like the one above. Outer leaves were harvested at intervals, leaving the plant to reproduce more leaves…”cut and come again”, as some gardeners call this method. It’s now September, and we’re still enjoying fresh, sweet lettuce!

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Cherry tomatoes in the greenhouse.

Here’s a quotation I like, which connects vegetable gardening with helping the environment:

Odd as I am sure it will appear to some, I can think of no better form of personal involvement in the care of the environment than that of gardening. A person who is growing a garden, if she/he is growing it organically, is improving a piece of the world. She/he is producing something to eat, which makes her/him somewhat independent of the grocery business, but she/he is also enlarging, for her/himself, the meaning of food and the pleasure of eating.

–Wendell Berry (from: “Think Little”, 1970)

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A forest of kale!

Healthy soil is the basis of a productive veggie patch. We augment the existing earth with organic soil from a local company, along with compost from our own back yard compost bins. These bins get a steady supply of organic, only plant-based kitchen peelings and scraps. It’s all vegan. Also important to note: no pesticides, herbicides or chemical fertilizers are used in the garden.

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Amaranth plants, growing at the foot of a Columnar Apple tree, and sharing the bed with some young raspberry bushes.

Amaranth leaves are delicious, lightly stir fried with a tiny bit of extra virgin olive oil and a dash of water, along with whatever other veggies you fancy. The leaves are almost too beautiful to eat, resembling Coleus plants, to my eye.

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Potatoes, Amaranth & Cherry tomatoes.

These delicious potatoes were grown in buckets of soil, using eyes from potatoes which had gone to seed, in the spring.  We’d already eaten the larger ones by the time I took this photo. Honestly, they were the best potatoes I’ve ever tasted! (The buckets are the standard white, plastic variety, with drainage holes drilled in the bottoms. Not that we like to use plastic, but since they had already been produced, they were at least put to good use! And they will be used for years to come.)

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Potatoes, onions, carrots & peas.

The potatoes pictured above were planted directly into the ground, rather than into buckets. And these were edible pod peas, growing in a container. Delicious!

I’ll end with another favourite quotation:

We’re a rambly type of garden. We can’t make it all immaculate. A certain amount of romantic disorder is a happy compromise.

–Henry Robinson (from: The English Garden Magazine, January 2001)

Right on, Henry!

To be continued…

September 13th, 2019: Here’s a wee update about AMARANTH:

Amaranthus viridis, or slim amaranth, is known as “VLITA” in Greece, where it is a common green vegetable, grown in gardens all around that country. There are about 60 varieties of Amaranth throughout the world, and at least one of them is grown for its seeds. Back in the 1970’s, when we were first becoming “vegetarian”, my husband and I ate Amaranth as a cereal. The seeds are used as a grain, and as a flour. What a wonderful, beautiful plant!

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amaranth

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Maidenhair Fern (Adiantum pedatum) in a container in our back garden. Canary Island Ivy (Hedera Canariensis) leaf peeking through the fern fronds.

I’m more relaxed about gardening than I used to be, and am enjoying letting Mother Nature have her way. She creates beauty at every turn, with little interference from me! Green is her colour of preference, which is obvious to anyone who walks through a forest.

These days, green is my favourite colour in the garden, and elsewhere. Being a cool colour, it provides a sense of calm and peacefulness, similar to the effect of blue. Because green plants appear to be in the background, they add a feeling of spaciousness to garden beds. For me, green represents Nature at its best, and is the colour of life and hopefulness. The following photographs were taken while we were on a walk in Pacific Spirit Park, in July, 2019, on one of the many beautiful trails there. Each photograph shows only native plants, which have grown here on the southwest coast of Canada for many centuries.

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Salal (Gaultheria shallon)

***Green is the prime colour of the world, and that from which its loveliness arises.

                                                               —Pedro Calderon de la Barca

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Red Huckleberry (Vaccinium parvifolium)

No white nor red was ever seen

So amorous as this lovely green.

—Andrew Marvell

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Vine Maple (Acer circinatum) trees among the Douglas Firs ((Pseudotsuga menziesii)

This is second-growth forest, re-planted in the early 1900’s, following intensive logging. The original evergreen trees were massive giants, and a few of their trunks are still visible throughout the park. They were mainly Western Red Cedars and Douglas Firs.

It was with awe

That I beheld

Fresh leaves, green leaves

Bright in the sun.

—Basho

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Moss on Douglas Fir bark

***If there is a future, it will be Green.

—Petra Kelly

By “Green”, I think that Petra Kelly means that humanity will be using renewable energy sources, such as solar, wind, and other clean methods which do not emit carbon, and will thus help to slow down the rate of global warming and climate change.

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Vine Maples and Western Hemlock (Tsuga heterophylla) tree.

***A forest is green for a reason.

—Anthony T. Hincks

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Western Sword Fern (Polystichum munitum) and Salal

***Green is a soothing colour, isn’t it?

—Jack Thorne

Here’s a little song some of you may remember, from Sesame Street:

It’s Not Easy Being Green (Kermit’s Song). Kermit is a frog, of course! 🙂

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Mossy stairs to nowhere, at Shaughnessy United Church on West 33rd Avenue.

Mossy stairs to nowhere, at Shaughnessy United Church on West 33rd Avenue.

Some people trek through the wilds of Patagonia, or the Himalayas, or Malaysia. I trek through my home-town of Vancouver. I call this “Urban Trekking”.

Instead of complaining about all of the changes and rapid “development” which are happening around us here, I’m looking for pockets of magical beauty in the city.

Here are a few recently discovered beautiful spaces, nestled inside the urban wilderness.

Gastown Alley

Gastown Alley

Shop in Gastown

Shop in Gastown

Display of succulent plants in Gastown shop

Display of succulent plants in Gastown shop

Trilliums in my back garden

Trilliums in my back garden

Today’s Quotation:

The real voyage of discovery consists not in seeking new landscapes but in having new eyes.

—Marcel Proust

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Third and final (for now) in my series of “Hidden Treasures of Vancouver”, this is an eclectic selection from my ramblings about town. As a person who walks a fair bit, and slowly, at that, I tend to stop and really look at things. And having a camera in hand is all the better!

Magical Green "Tunnel" on Wall Street. (Photo by PEB)

Magical Green “Tunnel” on Wall Street. (Photo by PEB)

Dunbar Street Village, at West 18th Avenue

Dunbar Street Village, at West 18th Avenue

Pocket Garden, near Granville Island

Pocket Garden, near Granville Island

Love these concrete containers!

Love these concrete containers!

One of my long-time favourite spots: Banyen Books, now on W. 4th Ave. at Dunbar St.

One of my long-time favourite spots: Banyen Books, now on W. 4th Ave. at Dunbar St.

Banyen's beautiful front entrance.

Banyen’s beautiful front entrance.

Banyen Bookstore's secret side garden, on Dunbar St.

Banyen Bookstore’s secret side garden, on Dunbar St.

Another of Vancouver's saved secret treasures: Jericho Lands. This almost got paved over!

Another of Vancouver’s saved secret treasures: Jericho Lands. This almost got paved over!

"I think that I shall never see a poem lovely as a tree."  -Joyce Kilmer

“I think that I shall never see a poem lovely as a tree.”
-Joyce Kilmer

At the Jericho Lands pond...Mallard Ducks.

At the Jericho Lands pond…Mallard Ducks.

Today’s Quotation:

Even if something is left undone, everyone must take time to sit still and watch the leaves turn.

-Elizabeth Lawrence

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Overlooking the bog.

Overlooking the bog.

Camosun Bog lies within Pacific Spirit Park on the west side of Vancouver, B.C., Canada. It is a memento of the last ice age, a rare ecosystem, a fragile and beautiful urban wilderness. Human development in and around the area nearly destroyed the bog, until a group of concerned local nature lovers joined forces to save it, starting in the early 1990’s.

The above is taken from the website: http://www.camosunbog.org .

Today’s Quotation:

Hope and the future for me are not in lawns and cultivated fields, not in towns and cities, but in the impervious and quaking swamps.

-Henry David Thoreau

Camosun Bog Raised Walkway

Camosun Bog Raised Walkway

Bog Writeup

Bog Writeup

Sphagnum Moss

Sphagnum Moss

Bog Plants

Bog Plants

Pond with Mallard Duck and Water lily pads.

Pond with Mallard Duck and Water lily pads.

Raised walkway to protect fragile bog plants.

Raised walkway to protect fragile bog plants.

Wild Blueberries for birds and other critters.

Wild Blueberries for birds and other critters.

Skunk Cabbage

Skunk Cabbage

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Today’s Quotation:

Eat food. Not too much. Mostly plants.

-Michael Pollan

Cycling to UBC Farm

Cycling to UBC Farm

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UBCfarm

UBC greenhouse

UBC Farm grassy field

UBC Farm grassy field

Wild Daisies.

Wild Daisies.

UBC Farm fields

UBC Farm Daisies

UBC Farm Directions 1

This wonderful farm, located on the UBC campus at the westernmost edge of Vancouver, has been saved from destruction by a group of dedicated volunteer/activists. Without their efforts, this site would now be covered by expensive condominiums and asphalt roads.

Just beyond the trees in the above photo, and just across Marine Drive, lies the mouth of the Fraser River where it enters the Salish Sea (formerly called The Strait of Georgia.) And just beyond the Salish Sea sits Vancouver Island, and the Pacific Ocean to the west of that.

Many school children learn about growing their own food here, mostly from seed. This is an ORGANICS ONLY farm, with no pesticides or herbicides used. Gardeners make their own compost, collect seeds, and help to run a weekend Farmers’ Market during the growing season.

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