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Senecio “Sunshine” (aka Brachyglottis)

The above perennial plant is one of my favourites, and I’m thankful that it seems to accept growing in a large container near our front door. I first saw one thriving in a seaside garden at our local beach, Spanish Banks, and fell in love with it. Even the leaves are lovely, being a grey-green shade, with a soft and downy texture.

What a summer we’ve had, with the most wildfires ever recorded in our province of British Columbia. For most of August the entire province was covered in a thick, smoky haze. Even here in Vancouver, for weeks at a time we couldn’t see the mountains clearly. Things are improving now that September has arrived. There are still fires burning, though, and the smell of smoke lingers in the air.

But back to more pleasant memories, which often involve flowers, for me!

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The bees absolutely loved this self-seeded Himalayan blackberry bush, (Rubus), which is growing around a laneway power pole. Even though the experts say that the Himalayan is an invasive species, it does provide food for the bees and other pollinators, then later on masses of berries for anyone passing by.

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Campanula poscharskyana, sharing a space with Red Valerian, Cranesbills, & Bamboo roots (!) in our front garden. Every year, this reliable, “rampant, spreading perennial” returns, with its jaunty mauve-blue flowers. It’s a good ground cover for a wild garden, like mine! The proper name is quite a mouthful. I just call it “Canterbury Bells”.

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Lychnis “Coronaria”, a shameless self-seeder, is spreading itself happily amongst the English Lavender on the boulevard. I admire these hardy volunteers, which take care of themselves so well. This Lychnis is drought-tolerant, and is just wonderfully flamboyant! The flowers were originally pale pink and white, but have reverted to pure white, which I quite like.

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Feverfew (Chrysanthemum parthenium) is such a hardy, cheerful little perennial, but is short-lived, and is usually grown as an annual. It’s a great plant for attracting pesky aphids away from the vegetable patch.

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Masterwort (Astrantia major)…perfection! I love the green-tipped petals.

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A hoverfly busily working with pollen grains on a Lily petal. I wish there was a way to include the heady fragrance of these gorgeous blooms in a blog post!

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And overlooking it all, a Bald Eagle perched on an evergreen tree a few doors up the street. The crows were very perturbed about this!

These photographs were taken with my trusty old Olympus digital camera.

To be continued, with photos from my cell phone…

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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The Birks Building, at West Hastings & Granville Street, built in 1908, was originally a Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce.

Vancouver, a modern and growing city, is home to an increasing number of stark-looking concrete and glass structures which, it seems to me, are lacking in beauty. With this in mind, I decided to embark on yet another “Urban Trekking” mission, in order to discover some of our oldest, most imposing buildings in the downtown core.

At the south east corner of West Hastings & Granville Street, I spotted what is now called The Birks Building, housing Vancouver’s venerable jewellery store, which we’ve always called simply “Birks”. This store was formerly at the corner of Granville and Georgia Street, in a lovely old building which has since been demolished.

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The Birks Clock, on Granville Street at West Hastings.

The famous “Birks Clock” was moved to its present location in front of the store when Birks  moved north a few blocks. Many Vancouverites, (myself included!) were relieved that this iconic clock was saved. For years, it had been a special place for friends to meet each other downtown. “I’ll meet you under the Birks clock”, we’d say, when planning a get-together.

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The Sinclair Centre, on West Hastings, at the North West corner of  Granville & Hastings.

The Sinclair Centre is actually four historical buildings which were joined and renovated in 1986. One of them is the Winch Building, built from 1908 to 1911. There is a bright and welcoming atrium in the middle of the complex.

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Sinclair Centre (please note: Canadian spelling of “Centre”. Merci beaucoup!)

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The Permanent Building, 330 West Pender Street. Gorgeous doorway. They don’t make doors like this any more!

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This was a delightful find! Especially on the grey, worn streets of downtown, it’s always a treat to discover something beautiful. Someone cared enough to use their imagination in creating this small but lovely “tableau” of living plants and a wrought iron gate. I think this is on the south side of West Pender Street, near Granville. (Note the padlocks!)

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The Dominion Building, (terracotta colour), at 207 West Hastings Street, as seen from the corner of Hastings & Homer. Built in 1910, this was Vancouver’s first steel-framed high-rise.

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Ceiling lights and decoration on the outside entrance of the Dominion Building.

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Pink Alleyway!! between Granville & Seymour Streets, just to the south of Hastings.

On the day I took this photo, there was a lively “Public Disco” event taking place.

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Inside the amazing Paper Hound Bookshop, on West Pender Street. Not just any old second hand bookstore, this one has a great selection of carefully chosen and  nicely displayed books. Notice the original brick wall, which was uncovered during restoration.

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Vintage sign discovered underneath the plaster on a Gastown store wall.

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Another original brick wall in Gastown, in The Old Faithful Shop, on West Cordova Street, decorated with a vintage Canadian canoe!

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Waterfront Station on West Cordova Street, in Gastown. Northern terminus of the Canada Line, dock and station of the Sea Bus to North Vancouver, and as you can see, a cruise ship is in port! Also the terminus for The Expo Line and the West Coast Express train.

Originally built by the Canadian Pacific Railway (CPR) as the Pacific terminus for their transcontinental passenger trains from Toronto and Montreal, the station was opened in 1914.

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Angel of Victory”, statue of a fallen soldier and angel, at Waterfront Station in Gastown.

Created by Montreal sculptor Coeur deLion McCarthy, this bronze copy of the original dates from 1921.

Just to the right of the building in this photograph, you’ll see two lovely trees. Yes, we have Palm trees in Vancouver. This is the mild and temperate Pacific Coast, after all!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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The Marine Building in downtown Vancouver, B.C., Canada.
My favourite heritage building in our home town. Re-blogging!

Joie du Soleil

The Marine Building The Marine Building

Located at 355 Burrard St. in downtown Vancouver, the Marine Building was designed by McCarter, Nairne and Partners in the late 1920’s. An elegant old “skyscraper”, its distinctive “Art Deco” styling depicts maritime themes as well as B.C.’s nautical flora and fauna.

As a child, I thought the creamy-coloured Art Deco details resembled icing on a cake, when viewed from a distance. Opened in October, 1930, this was the tallest building in Vancouver until 1939.

I am so thankful that the beautiful Marine Building remains standing in the downtown core. Being a young city, Vancouver does not have the historical old structures that European cities do. Many of our older buildings, which dated back just over half a century or even less, have been demolished already. With the constant threat of a major earthquake in this region, city planners are advocating replacing existing old buildings with quake-proof…

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After fifty years of crocheting, I’m still enjoying it, and recently completed yet another afghan. This “Square Medallion” pattern is started from the centre and worked in rounds, rather than in rows. Each square is edged in half double, then single crochet stitches, and finally all the squares are stitched together to create the finished blanket. My favourite pattern will always be the good old “Granny Square”, but Square Medallions come a close second!

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Perseverance seems to be the key attitude when working on any big project, and I’ve found a few helpful quotations which remind me to never give up:

It always seems impossible until it gets done.

—Nelson Mandela

It does not matter how slowly you go as long as you do not stop.

—Confucius

Just don’t give up trying to do what you really want to do.

—Ella Fitzgerald

Keep up the old fight!

—Uncle Doug Barton (my godfather:) (thanks, Marilyn, for sending me this quote!)

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Apparently, the much-loved little dog whose family received this afghan is very happy to share it with them! Good! Afghans are made to be used, and to provide comfort as well as warmth.

Now, what shall I crochet next?

I keep on keeping on…

—Frances Crowe (fl. 1800’s)

 

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Boat#3

“Fishing Boats at Sea”, by Claude Monet, 1868

As elders, sailing on this uncharted sea, we need all the help we can get! Here are some of my favourite quotations to help us navigate the waters.

Begin at once to live, and count each separate day as a separate life.

Seneca, Roman Stoic philosopher, 4 BCE-65 CE

Don’t die before you’re dead.

Rachel Wolchin, American writer

It ain’t over till it’s over.

—Yogi Berra, American baseball player, 1925-2015

I’ve had a ball. And as I get older, I just become an older kid.

Jonathan Winters, American actor/comedian, 1925-2013

For those of us who have endured (and survived!) long enough to be called “elders”, sometimes there is a need for encouragement. Fortitude is a word which comes to mind, and strength. These are two attributes that help us to keep on, one step at a time.

Here’s a video of a beautiful, inspiring, and graceful elder, Maia Helles, a retired ballet dancer. Filmed at her cottage on Fire Island in the U.S. when Maia was ninety-five years of age, it shows some of the exercises she practiced regularly.

Maia passed away in 2016 at the age of ninety-nine, leaving a wonderful legacy of hope and encouragement.

It may seem cloyingly upbeat, but this blog’s stated purpose is to “focus on the good”, and on the positive. Years ago, when some health challenges came into my life, I decided to do whatever I could to be my own best coach, my own best advocate. I do experience setbacks on my “positivity” journey at times, and have to get back on track with gentle but firm reminders to myself (and with much patience from my husband!).

A dear friend once said to me, while we were on a brisk exercise walk in the neighbourhood, “Just keep walking, Val!” She meant that I should keep walking rather than stopping to look at gardens every few feet! We were supposed to be exercising, after all. As it turns out, I frequently say those words to myself, especially when experiencing the occasional bout of loss of balance. Boarding city buses can be challenging at times, so I use the mantra, “Just keep walking, Val!”, to gain momentum as I climb aboard.

“Counting” also helps, particularly when going up or down stairs. Just plain counting, 1-2-3 etc., provides a steady rhythm, a sense of security, especially to those of us who have challenges with our vision. Better to count silently to oneself than to take a tumble!

In the depths of winter, I finally learned there was in me an invincible summer.

—Albert Camus, French philosopher, author, & journalist, 1913-1960

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Forget-me-not flowers in our back garden. I love their simplicity.

Take Heart!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Robson Street entrance/exit of the Vancouver Public Library, Central Branch

When it was first opened in May of 1995, the appearance of the Vancouver Public Library’s Central Branch left some of us rather bewildered. I say that because its design was quite different from anything we had seen before in our young and modern city. “Is the architect emulating the design of the Roman Colosseum?” we wondered. (“Colosseum” is the Roman spelling.) But now, twenty-three years later, most of us have grown to appreciate this unique and welcoming building, which is conveniently located in the centre of downtown Vancouver.

Bounded by Georgia, Robson, Homer and Hamilton Streets, the VPL covers an entire city block.

https://www.vpl.ca/location/central-library

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Georgia Street entrance/exit, Vancouver Public Library

Architect Moshe Safdie and DA Architects won the bid to build the library after the City held a design competition, with their design being the most popular choice. The resulting “Library Square” includes the Federal Office Tower and retail and service facilities, along with the nine story library.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vancouver_Public_Library

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Library Square with Office Tower, and one of the ubiquitous Vancouver cranes

No matter where one goes in Metro Vancouver, cranes dot the skyline! Construction is ongoing. The following photo shows the proposed design of the building going up across the street from the VPL:

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Now that is some design!! Merrick Architecture/Westbank Projects Corporation.

For as long as I can remember, I’ve been a book-lover, and libraries are like a second home to me. One of my earliest memories is of my mom reading Wind in the Willows, by Kenneth Grahame, aloud to me at bedtime. Mom loved literature, and wrote beautiful lyric nature poems, some of which were published in our local newspapers.

For me, even the imposing Central Branch of the VPL is welcoming, and offers much more than “just books”.

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The Promenade/Enclosed Concourse of Library Square

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Light is such an important factor in architectural design…(so many skylights to clean!).

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Remember these? Yes, it’s an old-fashioned phone booth, for our convenience, in Library Square!

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Leaving Library Square and its soaring skylights, we’re back out into the reality of Robson Street with its hustle and bustle, traffic, cafes, and shops. Until next time!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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This little Iris is an inspiration to me. Every spring, the flowers bravely re-appear, with absolutely no help or special care from anyone! For a small, unassuming plant, it has many names: Iris unguicularis, Iris stylosa, Algerian iris, Algerian winter iris, Winter iris.

Our Algerian iris grows from a gravel bed which is situated in a most challenging spot, nestled in amongst strong bamboo roots. It never fails to surprise me when, usually one day in March, I spot its beautiful flowers coming into bloom. This year, it first bloomed during a light snowfall back in late February, and is still blooming in early April. Never fazed, it is a little gem, and serves as a yearly reminder that spring will soon arrive!

For those of you who like plant details, here are the main points about Algerian iris:

Evergreen, rhizomatous, beardless iris.

H. to 8 in. (20cm)   S. indefinite   Almost stemless, flowers 2-3 in. (5-8cm) across

Flowers appear from late autumn to early spring. Prefers a sheltered site against a south or west-facing wall. (But ours is out in the open, except for those protective bamboo roots!)

 

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