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Posts Tagged ‘herbs’

Snake plant2

Snake Plant (Sansevieria trifasciata), July

A strange and wonderful thing happened this past July: our Snake Plant bloomed! Almost hidden behind a couch in the living room, it’s usually “out of sight, out of mind”. When I finally discovered where the mysterious and beautiful fragrance was coming from, I was delighted to find that it was this rare bloom sending forth its perfume. It lasted for many days, with a fragrance lovelier than the lily’s, and quite intoxicating. Apparently they bloom more readily if neglected, which this long-suffering houseplant definitely is! Here’s more information:

Snake Plant Info – How To Grow A Snake Plant And Snake Plant Care

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERARhododendron (a small, unknown variety), Spring

I’m including this unusual-looking Rhodo because I’ve never seen one bloom in this manner before. It seemed to go rather wild this year. Maybe it’s suffering from a bit of neglect just like the Snake Plant is, and is valiantly trying to reproduce itself…who knows? Can anyone name this Rhodo?

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Bugleweed (Ajuga reptans), Spring

It may be considered a weed by some, but I love it anyway! Here’s the Ajuga, bravely flowering in amongst the Sedums, Valerian and bamboo shoots. Such a gorgeous shade of purplish blue.

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Japonica (Chaenomeles), sometimes known as “Ornamental Quince”, Spring

Possibly my favourite flowering shrub in our garden, this particular beauty has survived two changes of address in the past 25 years. It produces plum-sized fruits every year, which the squirrels cart off with some difficulty.

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Camellia japonica, Spring

Another hardy survivor, this healthy shrub was given to me by a good friend, many years ago. It, too, has lived through two garden moves…maybe three. Such resilience!

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Lewisia, Spring

While it bloomed brilliantly on the deck, this Lewisia’s container remained upright when the raccoon scaled the railing behind it! You can see the raccoon’s paw prints on the white boards in the background. City raccoons are resilient, too…they have to be, to survive the traffic in Vancouver!

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Sage (Salvia officinalis), Summer

And over in our daughter’s garden, here’s the ever-hardy Sage plant. I only wish that I used it in my cooking! However, the bees do love it, and its strong fragrance is quite refreshing.

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Seaside Plantain (Plantago maritima), Summer

Yes, this is usually classified as a weed among the gardening aficionados! But the lowly Seaside Plantain leaves are actually edible, and this native plant could be classified as a (an) herb. Besides, I like the look of it!

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Basil (Ocimum basilicum), Summer

Who can resist Pasta with Pesto, made with fresh basil leaves? Delicious!

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Sun Rose or Moss Rose (Portulaca grandiflora), Summer

This reliable, colourful little plant is actually a tender annual, and is not hardy. I used to plant it in a boulevard bed, but have resorted to potting it in a container, because the dogs and squirrels tended to interfere with it every summer. Portulaca flowers make me smile!

I’ll end this post with a couple of thought-provoking quotations:

***Garden as though you will live forever.

                                   —William Kent (1685-1748) British architect & Landscape architect

***You cannot get through a single day without having an impact on the world around you. What you do makes a difference, and you have to decide what kind of difference you want to make.

                                     —Jane Goodall (b. 1934) English Primatologist

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Above photo is of a lovely & prolific climbing rose, name unknown. Spring, 2017.

The boulevard grass at our daughter’s place is gradually disappearing, being replaced with flowering herbs, perennials and vegetables. The bees love it, and so do we! People walking by on the sidewalk now see a changing “panorama” of greenery and blooms, all year long. Having a boulevard garden helps to create a feeling of community, providing the opportunity to talk with neighbours and others who happen to pass by when the gardener is out there working. And I get my exercise all during the growing season! I’m very grateful for the chance to work (play) in this great little garden!

All my hurts my garden spade can heal.

Ralph Waldo Emerson

Here’s how the boulevard garden is shaping up:

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Chives, Oregano, & Mint growing by the sidewalk. These easygoing herbs attract a multitude of bees, which are such valuable pollinators!

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Pinks, which have a gorgeous, spicy fragrance, and Creeping Charlie, despised by some gardeners, but appreciated by me for its ability to be a freely spreading ground cover, thus keeping out the weeds! As a bonus, Charlie has tiny mauve flowers in the spring, which to my eye are very pretty.

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Sage, blooming in June. I tucked this plant into a bed near the vegetable patch. Sage is such a strong plant, with amazingly “pungent” leaves!

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Newly built planter boxes…squash plants in this one. It’s surprising, and very gratifying, to see how much food can be grown once the grass is replaced with vegetable beds and boxes.

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Hosta blooms. This one is quite imposing!

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Canterbury Bells. (*see note below)

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Can anyone tell me, is this a butterfly on the Aster flower, or a moth? I’m guessing butterfly. Beautiful, isn’t it?

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And finally, a very welcome bumblebee on the Aster plant. The pollinators (all sorts of bees and butterflies) are attracted to these Asters, and to the flowering herbs, just around the corner of the boulevard.

***Please remember not to use insecticides, herbicides, or any genetically modified seeds or plants in your gardens! GMO’s contain hidden pesticides. All of these toxic products are causing drastic losses in the bee and  butterfly populations.  Without these wonderful insects, our ability to produce food will be greatly reduced.

I can enjoy flowers quite happily without translating them into Latin.

–Cornelia Otis Skinner

*Note: Me too, Cornelia! However, the Latin name for the Canterbury Bells pictured above, in case anyone wonders, is:

Campanula poscharskyana, (Serbian bellflower, trailing bellflower), a semi-evergreen trailing perennial. Native to the Dinaric Alps in former Yugoslavia, along the Western edge of the Balkan Peninsula.

Here it is, December 21st, 2017, the Winter Solstice, also known as Midwinter. And that’s a wrap for the 2017 Boulevard Garden Highlights!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Bee on Lavender (Lavandula angustifolia….English Lavender)

Grown in slow-motion by Nana (moi), the boulevards at our daughter’s family home are being transformed. Be gone, foul grass! And welcome, herbs and perennials!

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Work in progress…a perennial bed in the making…

Nature does not hurry, yet everything is accomplished.

—Lao Tzu

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Oregano, Mint & Marjoram (very attractive to bees, and organically grown!)

Bees have been experiencing a rough time worldwide, due to a variety of human-caused problems. Pesticides, herbicides, loss of habitat, climate change, lack of flowering plants which are loved by bees, mite infestations in hives, (caused in part by lowered immunity, as a result of stress, perhaps?), and on it goes.

Planting flowering herbs and perennials which bees love for their nectar is one way that we can help the bee population to become stronger. Without the bees and their ability to pollinate plants, much of the food we eat would not be able to grow.

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Sedum “Autumn Joy” & Michaelmas Daisy (Aster)

My garden has a mind of its own, and I love it! Just when I think that my garden ideas are working out as planned, up pops a surprise. For example, this little Aster plant hitched a ride (unbeknownst to me) from the previous garden to its new home, hidden in amongst the Sedum leaves. Instead of trying to control everything, I’ve decided to let it be, and just enjoy the mingling of the flowers and leaves, and their attractive colours.

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Michaelmas Daisy (Aster x frikartii ‘Monch’) and English Lavender (Lavandula angustifolia)

There is no gardening without humility. Nature is constantly sending even its oldest scholars to the bottom of the class for some egregious blunder.

Alfred Austin

When I’m down on my knees, digging out the grass to create new flower beds, I certainly feel humbled! As you can see, there is plenty of grass to dig out, still. It all goes into the city’s “green bin”, to be composted along with Vancouver’s food scraps and whatever garden trimmings don’t get put into our own garden compost bins.

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There’s so much work to be done! A little at a time is my approach….this is going to be a short stretch of shade garden. I plan to add ferns, hostas, and plenty of home-made compost. The soil is depleted and dry, just crying out for some organic matter to be added!

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And finally, serendipity! I’d always meant to grow some of these in other gardens:

California Poppy (Eschscholzia californica) & Cornflower (Centaurea cyanus)

And up they popped, all on their own, self-seeded in the long grass under a phone pole, planted there by the previous owners. This week I’m going to plant more poppy and cornflower seeds, as Autumn is a great time to do it. But first, out with the dratted grass!

 

 

 

 

 

 

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